Thursday, April 26, 2018

In the news, Wednesday, April 4, 2018


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APR 03      INDEX      APR 05
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Information from some sites may not be reliable, or may not be vetted.
Some sources may require subscription.

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from Christianity Today
Media/News Company based in Carol Stream, Illinois

6 Reasons Many Pastors Don’t Need An Office Any More
For most pastors, a desk in an office is one of the least creative spaces imaginable. Many of us don’t need an office, because we don’t need a desk. And we don’t need a desk because we don’t need to put a phone on it. Or a typewriter. Or a computer, a Rolodex, or a fax machine. It’s been more than a decade since I used a desk to spread out an array of Bible translations, a lexicon, a Bible encyclopedia, a concordance and commentaries to prepare a sermon. All those tools are on my laptop now, which fits very efficiently on… my lap.

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from Conciliar Post

IS DOUBT A GOOD THING?
Considered generally, doubt is beneficial to human beings. While we all begin life in a state of ignorance—relying upon the care and concern of others to survive—too many of us eventually enter a state of arrogance. Neither position is desirable, but these are the two ends of the spectrum of knowledge spectrum toward which we gravitate. The object of Theology is not to know, but rather to love.

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from FEE (Foundation for Economic Education)
RIGHT-CENTER BIAS, HIGH, non-profit organization

Trump’s Failing Grade on Trade Threatens His Overall GPA on Economic Policy
Speaking of report cards, here’s a mock report card I created for the President. It’s not as amusing as the mock college transcript from Obama’s time at Columbia, but it highlights how bad policy—on spending as well as trade—is offsetting good policy. He is hopeless on trade, and I sometimes wonder if he wants a failing grade.

Social Security Is Doomed. Now What?
No matter how you slice it, the program is going to fail.

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from The Hill
LEFT-CENTER BIAS, MIXED, newspaper in Washington, D.C.

Citizenship question won't be most pernicious aspect of US Census
From 1890 through 2000 (excluding the 1960 Census), the long version of the Census form asked about citizenship status, as the Census’s American Community Survey, received by around 3.5 million households each year, currently does. At what point did inquiries about citizenship become the moral equivalent of a “direct attack” on our country? Regardless of whether the citizenship question is included in the 2020 Census, respondents will be assured that they have nothing to fear because the information they provide will never be used against them. In 2010, the House of Representatives passed a resolution assuring Americans that “the data obtained from the Census are protected under United States privacy laws.” But the Census Bureau has a long history of betraying respondents. In the early 1940s, the Census brazenly violated federal law by providing key information on Japanese Americans so that the Army could round as many as 120,000 people up for internment camps. The detentions were among the worst civil liberties violations in modern U.S. history.

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from LifeZette (& PoliZette)
Media/News Company in Washington, D. C.

Sorry, Mark Zuckerberg — No Oval Office for You
Facebook co-founder is widely thought to be ambitious for the nation's highest office, but losing the trust of Americans is a serious blow

Huntington Beach Challenges the Legality of Sanctuary Bill
California city goes one step beyond other municipalities, counties in Golden State that are rising up against Sacramento's rogue immigration policies

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from Miami Herald

The words, image and memory of King have been ubiquitous here this week, 50 years after he “got into Memphis” to lead a march on behalf of striking sanitation workers.

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from Mises Institute
[Information from this site may not be reliable.]

CITIZENSHIP QUESTION WON'T BE MOST PERNICIOUS ASPECT OF US CENSUS
The hubbub over the Trump administration’s proposal to ask respondents about citizenship in the 2020 Census is mystifying because the response is so far out of proportion to the White House’s request. But the dispute is obscuring a much greater peril that the Census Bureau poses to Americans.

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from The Spokesman-Review
Newspaper in Spokane, Washington

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