Thursday, April 12, 2018

In the news, Thursday, March 29, 2018


________

MAR 28      INDEX      MAR 30
________


Information from some sites may not be reliable, or may not be vetted.
Some sources may require subscription.

________

from Competitive Enterprise Institute
RIGHT-CENTER BIAS

Hope for Reforming Obama-Era Fuel Economy Mandates at EPA
The Environmental Protection Agency is approaching the April 1st deadline to complete its Midterm Evaluation of the Obama administration’s fuel economy and motor vehicle greenhouse gas emission standards for model years 2022-2025. EPA is widely expected to scale back the standards for those years, and possibly for model year 2021 as well. Automakers have long complained that the standards are too stringent and will price millions of Americans out of the market for new cars. The California Air Resources Board (CARB) now warns that if the Trump administration repudiates the Obama administration standards, California and its 13 allied states will impose their own standards on new motor vehicles sold within their borders. Although automakers want relief from the Obama administration standards, they also fear the prospect of a market-balkanizing “patchwork” of multiple fuel economy regimes if California “de-couples” from the so-called harmonized National Vehicle Program jointly administrated by EPA, CARB, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

________

from Hoover Institution
Nonprofit Organization in Stanford, California

A Brief Guide To Strategy And Sanctions
Recently, the United States’ closest European allies, Britain, France, and Germany, proposed “fresh” economic sanctions on Iran as an effort to force Tehran to comply with both the letter and the spirit of the 2015 “Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action” meant to delay the Islamic Republic’s development of nuclear weapons. But the real target of the EU action was in Washington: President Donald Trump wants European help to “fix the terrible flaws of the Iran nuclear deal” negotiated by his predecessor, and Trump has threatened to pull the United States out of the agreement if he doesn’t get his way.

Do Economic Sanctions Work?
Economic strictures are acts of war. Throughout history, the starvation and disease they have caused have killed more people than all other instruments of war. But like all other instruments, their effectiveness depends on the circumstances in which they are used and on the policies of which they are part. Economic sanctions compromise between doing whatever it takes to achieve a given objective, and doing nothing, by doing something half-heartedly. Like much of the rest of U.S. national security policy, economic sanctions are self-stroking pretense.

Sanctions: The Record And The Rewards
Why are sanctions so popular? Because “there is nothing else between words and military action to bring pressure upon a government,” explains Jeremy Greenstock, Britain’s long-term ambassador at the UN. It is bloodless—warfare on the cheap. Nonlethal means are the main attraction for democracies loath to go to war in remote places against states that do not pose an existential threat.

________

from NCWLIFE
TV Channel in Wenatchee, WA

Wenatchee World Sold to Arizona-Based Wick Communications
All employees of The World have been offered jobs with Wick Communications

________



from RAND Corporation

Hypersonic missiles travel at a speed of one mile per second or more—at least five times the speed of sound. They are able to evade and conceal their precise targets from defenses until just seconds before impact. This leaves targeted states with almost no time to respond. Additionally, such weapons are capable of destroying targets without any explosives, using their kinetic energy alone. Hypersonic missiles require a reconsideration of traditional second-strike calculations, as they have the potential to decapitate a nation's leadership before it has the opportunity to launch a counter attack. As a result, a state facing a hypersonic missile threat must make the best of a bad situation, effectively forced to choose the lesser evil. It could authorize the military rather than the national leadership to conduct retaliatory strikes, but this would raise the risk of an accidental conflict. It could spread out its forces, making them more difficult to attack, but also rendering them more susceptible to sub-national seizure through a greater number of access points. It could deploy its regionally-strategic forces upon receiving the first warning of an attack, which would make crises exceedingly unstable. Finally, it could launch a preemptive strike upon its enemy. All of these choices invite trigger-happy state behavior.

________

from The Spokesman-Review
Newspaper in Spokane, Washington

________

from Sputnik
RIGHT-CENTER BIAS, MIXED, Broadcasting & Media Production Company out of Moscow, Russia

France Deploys Military Forces to Assist Kurdish Militants in Manbij - Reports
French-based media outlets reported on Thursday that French President Emmanuel Macron has vowed to send troops to Syria's Manbij in a bid to assist local Kurdish militias in preventing Turkish forces from advancing on the town.

________

from Washington Policy Center
Educational Research Center in Seattle, Washington

Two weeks in: state GPS tracker reveals $20,000 in potential fines
I have been researching the Road Usage Charge Pilot Project for about a year and am now a participant. The Pilot is a simulation of what it would be like to be taxed for every mile we drive, rather than for every gallon of gas we purchase at the pump. It has been about two weeks since I installed a GPS-enabled device in my car to track my mileage, the most invasive of the five methods of collection I was able to choose from (none of which were palatable). I’ve learned a couple things about the program in the last couple weeks, the most notable being that I am, apparently, a terrible driver. It has been surprising to see that not only is my mileage collected, but my driving patterns are evaluated and scored based on braking, acceleration, cornering and speed.

________

from The Wenatchee World

Wenatchee World sold to Wick Communications
The Wenatchee World, which has been published by the Woods family for 111 years, has been sold to Wick Communications, a third-generation family owned and operated media corporation, of Sierra Vista, Ariz. The announcement was made today by World Publisher Rufus G. Woods and Wick Chief Executive Officer Francis Wick. The asset sale, for an undisclosed amount, will take effect on March 31.

________


No comments:

Post a Comment